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The Engineering Transfer Program graduates students who are prepared to excel in any four-year Engineering Program in the country. An effort has been made to parallel the course requirements of Washington State University, http://www.mme.wsu.edu/wsuMEocb, or http://school.eecs.wsu.edu/wsuEEocb and the University of Washington. Students planning to transfer to other engineering programs should consult with the school's engineering advisors for any necessary modifications in the standard curriculum. 

Aerospace engineers design, develop, test and help manufacture commercial and military aircraft, missiles and space craft. They also may develop new technologies in commercial aviation, defense systems and space exploration. In this work, they tend to focus on one type of aerospace product such as commercial transports, helicopters, spacecraft or rockets.

Specialties within aerospace engineering include aerodynamics, propulsion, thermodynamics, structures, celestial mechanics, acoustics and guidance and control systems.

For more information on Aerospace Engineering contact the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.

To pursue Aeronautical Engineering you should work with an  Engineering Faculty Advisor as soon as possible to develop a plan of study leading to the Associate of Science Degree. 

It is especially critical to meet with a faculty advisor if you tested into a math class lower than MATH& 151 or an English class lower than ENGL& 101, or if you haven't had high school chemistry or physics.

If you haven't yet taken the Accuplacer test for placement contact the Assessment and Testing Center as soon as possible, but BEFORE contacting the faculty advisor. 

One ABET accredited Aerospace Engineering degree program in the Pacific Northwest

Bioengineering is a wide ranging field, alternatively referred to as biomedical engineering, which was created some 30 years ago by the merging interests of engineering and the biological/medical sciences. Bioengineers work closely with health professionals in the design of diagnostic and therapeutic devices for clinical use, the design of prosthetic devices, and the development of biologically compatible materials. Pacemakers, blood analyzers, cochlear implants, medical imaging, laser surgery, prosthetic implants, and life support systems are just a few of the many products and processes that have resulted from the team efforts of bioengineers and health professionals.

To pursue Biological Engineering you should work with an  Engineering Faculty Advisor as soon as possible to develop a plan of study leading to the Associate of Science Degree. 
It is especially critical to meet with a faculty advisor if you tested into a math class lower than MATH& 151 or an English class lower than ENGL& 101, or if you haven't had high school chemistry or physics.

If you haven't yet taken the Accuplacer test for placement contact the Assessment and Testing Center as soon as possible, but BEFORE contacting the faculty advisor.

 

ABET-Accredited Biological Systems Engineering degree programs in Pacific Northwest

Chemical engineers combine their engineering training with a knowledge of chemistry to transform the laboratory work of chemists into commercial realities. They are most frequently involved in designing and operating chemical production facilities and manufacturing facilities that use chemicals (or chemical processes) in their production of goods.

The work of chemical engineers can be seen in a wide variety of products that affect our daily lives, including plastics, building materials, food products, pharmaceuticals, synthetic rubber, synthetic fibers, and petroleum products. Chemical engineers also play a major role in keeping our environment clean by creating ways to clean up the problems of the past, prevent pollution in the future, and extend our shrinking natural resources. For more information on Chemical Engineering contact the American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

To pursue Chemical Engineering you should work with an  Engineering Faculty Advisor as soon as possible to develop a plan of study leading to the Associate of Science Degree.  It is especially critical to meet with a faculty advisor if you tested into a math class lower than MATH& 151 or an English class lower than ENGL& 101, or if you haven't had high school chemistry or physics.

If you haven't yet taken the Accuplacer test for placement contact the Assessment and Testing Center as soon as possible, but BEFORE contacting the faculty advisor. 

 

ABET-Accredited Chemical Engineering degree programs in Pacific Northwest

Civil engineering is the third largest and oldest branch of engineering. Major civil engineering projects date back more than 5,000 years. Today, civil engineers plan, design, and supervise the construction of facilities essential to modern life. Projects range from high-rise buildings to mass transit systems, from airports to water treatment plants, from space telescopes to off-shore drilling platforms. Civil engineering students typically specialize in one of these areas: structural engineering, transportation engineering, environmental engineering, water resources engineering, geotechnical engineering, surveying and construction engineering. For more information on Civil Engineering contact the American Society of Civil Engineers.

To pursue Civil and/or Environmental Engineering you should work with an  Engineering Faculty Advisor as soon as possible to develop a plan of study leading to the Associate of Science Degree.  It is especially critical to meet with a faculty advisor if you tested into a math class lower than MATH& 151 or an English class lower than ENGL& 101, or if you haven't had high school chemistry or physics.

If you haven't yet taken the Accuplacer test for placement contact the Assessment and Testing Center as soon as possible, but BEFORE contacting the faculty advisor. 

 

ABET-Accredited Civil Engineering degree programs in Pacific Northwest

Computer engineering, which had its beginnings as a specialty of option within electrical engineering and continues to rely on much of the same basic knowledge that the EE curriculum teaches, developed into a discipline of its own because of the growing need for specialized training in computer technology. To respond to this need, computer specialists in electrical engineering had to step up their research and course development, which increasingly brought them into contact with computer scientists. Today, although computer engineering and computer science remain separate disciplines, the work of computer engineers and computer scientists is often interdependent. While it is true that there is much overlap, computer engineers tend to focus more on computer hardware while computer scientists tend to focus on computer software. For more information on Computer Engineering contact the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.

To pursue Computer Engineering you should work with an  Engineering Faculty Advisor as soon as possible to develop a plan of study leading to the Associate of Science Degree.  It is especially critical to meet with a faculty advisor if you tested into a math class lower than MATH& 151 or an English class lower than ENGL& 101, or if you haven't had high school chemistry or physics.

If you haven't yet taken the Accuplacer test for placement contact the Assessment and Testing Center as soon as possible, but BEFORE contacting the faculty advisor. 

 

ABET-Accredited Computer Engineering degree programs in Pacific Northwest

Electrical engineers are concerned with electrical devices and systems and with the use of electrical energy. Virtually every industry utilizes electrical engineers, so employment opportunities are extensive. The work of electrical engineers can be seen in the entertainment systems in our homes, in the computers used by businesses, in numerically-controlled machines used by manufacturing companies, and in the early warning systems used by the federal government to ensure our national security.

Electrical engineering students typically specialize in one of these areas: computers, electronics, communications, power, controls and instrumentation. For more information on Electrical Engineering contact the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.

To pursue Electrical Engineering you should work with an  Engineering Faculty Advisor as soon as possible to develop a plan of study leading to the Associate of Science Degree. It is especially critical to meet with a faculty advisor if you tested into a math class lower than MATH& 151 or an English class lower than ENGL& 101, or if you haven't had high school chemistry or physics.

If you haven't yet taken the Accuplacer test for placement contact the Assessment and Testing Center as soon as possible, but BEFORE contacting the faculty advisor. 

 

ABET-Accredited Electrical Engineering degree programs in Pacific Northwest

Industrial engineers determine the most effective ways for an organization to use its various resources--people, machines, materials, information, and energy--to make a process or product. Their work does not stop there, however, for they also design and manage the quality control programs that monitor the production process at every step. They also may be involved in facilities and plant design, along with plant management and production engineering.

These multiple responsibilities of an industrial engineer require knowledge not only of engineering fundamentals, but also of computer technology and management practices. At first glance, the industrial engineer might be seen as the engineering equivalent of a systems analyst--except that the industrial engineer plays many more roles and has a much wider window of career opportunities.

Perhaps the single most distinguishing characteristic of industrial engineers is their involvement with the human and organizational aspects of systems design. Indeed, the Institute of Industrial Engineers (IIE) describes industrial engineering as "The People-Oriented Engineering Profession".

To pursue Industrial Engineering you should work with an  Engineering Faculty Advisor as soon as possible to develop a plan of study leading to the Associate of Science Degree. 

It is especially critical to meet with a faculty advisor if you tested into a math class lower than MATH& 151 or an English class lower than ENGL& 101, or if you haven't had high school chemistry or physics. 

If you haven't yet taken the Accuplacer test for placement contact the Assessment and Testing Center as soon as possible, but BEFORE contacting the faculty advisor. 

 

ABET-Accredited Industrial Engineering degree programs in the Pacific Northwest

Materials Engineers are generally responsible for improving the strength, corrosion resistance, fatigue resistance, and other characteristics of frequently used materials. They are also involved in selecting materials with desirable mechanical, electrical, magnetic, chemical, and heat transfer properties that meet special performance requirements. Examples are graphite golf club shafts that are light but stiff, ceramic tiles on the Space Shuttle that protect it from burning up during reentry into the atmosphere, and the alloy turbine blades in a jet engine.

Metallurgical engineers deal specifically with metals in one of the three main branches of metallurgy--extractive, physical and mechanical. Extractive metallurgists are concerned with removing metals from ores and refining and alloying them to obtain useful metal. Physical metallurgists study the nature, structure, and physical properties of metals and their alloys, and design methods for processing them into final products. Mechanical metallurgists develop and improve metal-working processes such as casting, forging, rolling, and drawing. For more information contact the Minerals, Metals and Materials Society (TMS).

To pursue Material Science and Engineering you should work with an  Engineering Faculty Advisor as soon as possible to develop a plan of study leading to the Associate of Science Degree.  It is especially critical to meet with a faculty advisor if you tested into a math class lower than MATH& 151 or an English class lower than ENGL& 101, or if you haven't had high school chemistry or physics.

If you haven't yet taken the Accuplacer test for placement contact the Assessment and Testing Center as soon as possible, but BEFORE contacting the faculty advisor. 

 

ABET-Accredited Material Science Engineering degree programs in Pacific Northwest

Mechanical engineers design tools, engines, machines and other mechanical equipment. They design and develop power-producing machines such as internal combustion engines, steam and gas turbines, and jet and rocket engines. They also design and develop power-using machines such as refrigeration and air-conditioning equipment, robots, machine tools, materials handling systems and industrial production equipment. The work of mechanical engineers varies by industry and function. Specialties include, among others, applied mechanics, design, energy systems, pressure vessels and piping, and heating, refrigeration, and air-conditioning systems. Mechanical engineers also design tools needed by other engineers for their work. For more information on Mechanical Engineering contact the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

To pursue Mechanical Engineering you should work with an  Engineering Faculty Advisor as soon as possible to develop a plan of study leading to the Associate of Science Degree.  It is especially critical to meet with a faculty advisor if you tested into a math class lower than MATH& 151 or an English class lower than ENGL& 101, or if you haven't had high school chemistry or physics.

If you haven't yet taken the Accuplacer test for placement contact the Assessment and Testing Center as soon as possible, but BEFORE contacting the faculty advisor. 

 

ABET-Accredited Mechanical Engineering degree programs in Pacific Northwest.

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering

Washington State University is now offering the last two years of a 4-year Bachelor of Science Degree in Mechanical Engineering at Olympic College- Bremerton.  This program is open to all students that are able to certify into the WSU BSME program.  It is assumed that students who enter the program will have completed the first two years of the program through the AS (Transfer) degree at their local community college.  More information about the courses that a student should complete at any specific community college can be found at https://vcea.wsu.edu/transferstudents/. If you are completing an AST degree and want more information about this program including certification requirements, please visit www.mme.wsu.edu/wsuMEocb OR http://www.olympic.edu/engineering/wsu-mechanical-engineering-bremerton-wsumeocbProgram Announcement flier (PDF). 

For more information, please contact: Dr. Marvin Pitts, Program Coordinator and Professor
WSU Mechanical Engineering at Olympic College Bremerton
Science & Technology Building, Room 110
1600 Chester Avenue, Bremerton, WA 98337-1699 | O: 360.475.7543 | pitts@wsu.edu

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEER

Agricultural engineers are involved in every aspect of food production, processing, marketing, and distribution. Agricultural engineers design and develop agricultural equipment, food processing equipment, and farm structures. Major technical areas of agricultural engineering include food processing, information and electrical technologies, power and machinery, structures, soil and water, forestry, bioengineering, and aqua culture. With their technological knowledge and innovations, agricultural engineers have literally revolutionized the farming industry, enabling farmers today to produce approximately ten times more than what they could just 100 years ago. For more information, contact the American Society of Agricultural Engineers (ASAE).

One ABET accredited Agricultural Engineering degree program in the Pacific Northwest

  • University of Idaho, Moscow, ID

ARCHITECTURAL ENGINEERS

Architectural engineers work closely with architects on the design of buildings. Whereas the architect focuses primarily on space utilization and aesthetics, the architectural engineer is concerned with safety, cost, and sound construction methods.


BIOENGINEERING

Bioengineering is a wide ranging field, alternatively referred to as biomedical engineering, which was created some 30 years ago by the merging interests of engineering and the biological/medical sciences. Bioengineers work closely with health professionals in the design of diagnostic and therapeutic devices for clinical use, the design of prosthetic devices, and the development of biologically compatible materials. Pacemakers, blood analyzers, cochlear implants, medical imaging, laser surgery, prosthetic implants, and life support systems are just a few of the many products and processes that have resulted from the team efforts of bioengineers and health professionals.


CERAMIC ENGINEER

Ceramic engineers direct processes that convert nonmetallic minerals, clay, or silicates into ceramic products. Ceramic engineers work on products as diverse as glassware, semiconductors, automobile and aircraft engine components, fiber-optic phone lines, tiles on space shuttles, solar panels, and electric power line insulators.


MANUFACTURING ENGINEERS

Manufacturing engineers are involved in all aspects of manufacturing a product. These include studying the behavior and properties of required materials, designing appropriate systems and equipment, and managing the overall manufacturing process. For more information, contact the Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME).

One ABET accredited Manufacturing Engineering degree program in the Pacific Northwest


MATERIALS ENGINEERS

Materials engineers are generally responsible for improving the strength, corrosion resistance, fatigue resistance, and other characteristics of frequently used materials. They are also involved in selecting materials with desirable mechanical, electrical, magnetic, chemical, and heat transfer properties that meet special performance requirements.

Examples are graphite golf club shafts that are light but stiff, ceramic tiles on the Space Shuttle that protect it from burning up during reentry into the atmosphere, and the alloy turbine blades in a jet engine. Metallurgical engineers deal specifically with metals in one of the three main branches of metallurgy--extractive, physical and mechanical. Extractive metallurgists are concerned with removing metals from ores and refining and alloying them to obtain useful metal. Physical metallurgists study the nature, structure, and physical properties of metals and their alloys, and design methods for processing them into final products. Mechanical metallurgists develop and improve metal-working processes such as casting, forging, rolling, and drawing. For more information contact the Minerals, Metals and Materials Society (TMS).


MINING & GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING

The work of mining and geological engineers is similar to that of petroleum engineers. the main difference is the target of their efforts. That is, mining and geological engineers are involved in all aspects of discovering, removing, and processing minerals from the earth. The mining engineer designs the mine layout, supervises its construction, and devises systems to transport minerals to processing plants.

The mining engineer also devises plans to return the area to its natural state after extracting the minerals. For more information, contact the Society of Mining, Metallurgy, and Exploration (SME-AIME).

One ABET accredited Mining and one Geological Engineering degree program in the Pacific Northwest


NUCLEAR ENGINEERS

Nuclear engineers are involved in the design, construction, and operation of nuclear power plants for power generation, propulsion of nuclear submarines, and space power systems. Nuclear engineers are also involved in processes for handling nuclear fuels, safely disposing radioactive wastes, and using radioactive isotopes for medical purposes. For more information, contact American Nuclear Society (ANS).

One ABET accredited Nuclear Engineering degree program in the Pacific Northwest


OCEAN ENGINEERS

Ocean engineers are involved in the design of offshore drilling platforms, harbor facilities, breakwaters and underwater machines. Naval architects are involved in the design of ships and other seagoing vessels. For more information, contact the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers (SNAME).


PETROLEUM ENGINEERS

Petroleum engineers work in all capacities related to petroleum (gas and oil) and its byproducts. These include designing processes, equipment, and systems for locating new sources of oil and gas; sustaining the flow of extant sources; removing, transporting, and storing oil and gas; and refining them into useful products. For more information, contact the Society of Petroleum Engineers (SPE).

One ABET accredited Petroleum Engineering degree program in the Pacific Northwest


SYSTEMS ENGINEERS

Systems engineers are involved with the overall design, development, and operations of large, complex systems. Their focus is not so much on the individual components that comprise such systems; rather, they are responsible for the integration of each component into a complete, functioning "whole." Predicting and overseeing the behavior of large-scale systems often involves knowledge of advanced mathematical and computer-based techniques, such as linear programming, queuing theory, and simulation.